Vision for the Poor is a non-governmental organization dedicated to developing social service eye clinics in Latin America and Haiti by empowering local eye care providers to offer their services to the poorest of the poor. Along with our partners, most notably the International Eye Foundation and Optometry Giving Sight, our goal is to establish sustainable eye care facilities. The first sustainable eye care network was established in Guatemala in 1997, and it now serves as a model for future development in other countries.

It is our mission...

...to reduce human suffering and improve quality of life through the recovery of sight by building sustainable eye clinics in developing countries, empowering local eye specialists, funding essential ophthalmic infrastructure and establishing partnerships with like-minded agencies.

Vision 2020 ~ The Right to Sight

Vision for the Poor cooperates with a worldwide program known as Vision 2020 – The Right to Sight. VISION 2020: The Right to Sight is a global joint initiative of the World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness (IAPB), with its international coalition of Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), professional associations, eye care institutions and corporations. VISION 2020 aims to eliminate avoidable blindness worldwide by the year 2020, in order to give everyone in the world "the Right to Sight."

Board of Directors

  • Executive Director:
    Douglas Villella, OD
    Optometrist
    Erie, PA

  • Linda Boss
    Optician, Business Owner
    Pittsburgh, PA

  • Christian Wurst
    Business Owner
    Hatboro, PA

  • Mariano Yee, MD
    Ophthalmologist and Medical Director, Visualiza
    Guatemala

To learn more about Vision for the Poor, visit www.visionforthepoor.org.

Partners

Give the Gift of Sight!

Your climb will help give the Gift of Sight to poor patients in Guatemala, Nicaragua, Haiti Peru and Mexico! Learn how your trip can be FREE!

Our climb was an amazing challenge. We hiked for three days to the Kibo Hut base camp, slept for just a few hours, and then began our climb at 11 p.m. We hiked through the night, under the full moon, reaching the summit around 7 a.m. The air was thin and our bodies were exhausted. People on the summit seemed to be delusional from altitude and lack of oxygen. As we walked the last hour on the summit ridge, the light of the full moon faded and the sun rose illuminating the African sky. Hiking above the clouds, on a dormant volcano, looking out on glaciers, we could see the world below us, just a sea of clouds. Mountains have an amazing healing power, which remind us just how small we are in the grander scheme of things. I am thankful to have spent time on this mountain and in this dynamic country.

Lindsay Yost